Is a vasectomy really permanent, or can it be reversed?

I keep hearing that a vasectomy is a permanent form of birth control, but then I also hear that it can be reversed. I'm 25 years old and don’t want to have children now, but maybe in the future. I’ve considered having a vasectomy, but would like to know if it’s permanent or not.

ANSWERS FROM DOCTORS (6)


Answered by Anand M. Dhanda, MD, FACS

Yes, it can be reversed.

Published on Feb 16, 2015

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Answered by Anand M. Dhanda, MD, FACS

Yes, it can be reversed.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Bruce R. Gilbert, M.D., Ph.D.

Vasectomy should always be considered a permanent procedure. Vasectomy reversal is often possible; however, there are many reasons why the patient is not as fertile as they were prior to the vasectomy. Men in their twenties without children should consider other forms of contraception. Best to speak with your urologist about the options.

Published on Feb 12, 2015

Answered by Bruce R. Gilbert, M.D., Ph.D. (View Profile)

Vasectomy should always be considered a permanent procedure. Vasectomy reversal is often possible; however, there are many reasons why the patient is not as fertile as they were prior to the vasectomy. Men in their twenties without children should consider other forms of contraception. Best to speak with your urologist about the options.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Marvin L. Stein, MD, FACS

Yes, it is considered permanent, but it can be reversed. However, there is a chance that it may not work. If you are unsure, don't do it until you are.

Published on Feb 12, 2015

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Answered by Marvin L. Stein, MD, FACS

Yes, it is considered permanent, but it can be reversed. However, there is a chance that it may not work. If you are unsure, don't do it until you are.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Ira D. Sharlip, MD

A vasectomy can be reversed. There are two ways to restore fertility after vasectomy: surgical vasectomy reversal and needle extraction of sperm from the testes with an in vitro fertilization procedure. Both procedures are very expensive ($10,000 to 20,000 in most locations). The success rate for pregnancy with vasectomy reversal is about 65 percent and with sperm retrieval/IVF is about 50 percent. This is why vasectomy should never be used as a temporary method of contraception.

Published on Feb 12, 2015

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Answered by Ira D. Sharlip, MD

A vasectomy can be reversed. There are two ways to restore fertility after vasectomy: surgical vasectomy reversal and needle extraction of sperm from the testes with an in vitro fertilization procedure. Both procedures are very expensive ($10,000 to 20,000 in most locations). The success rate for pregnancy with vasectomy reversal is about 65 percent and with sperm retrieval/IVF is about 50 percent. This is why vasectomy should never be used as a temporary method of contraception.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Marc Greenstein D.O.

Vasectomy is reversible but only under extreme circumstances - new marriage, child death, change of heart. I would advise you not to have a vasectomy at this time unless you are 100% convinced that you do not want to father children.

Published on Feb 12, 2015

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Answered by Marc Greenstein D.O.

Vasectomy is reversible but only under extreme circumstances - new marriage, child death, change of heart. I would advise you not to have a vasectomy at this time unless you are 100% convinced that you do not want to father children.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Steven N. Gange, MD, FACS

Vasectomy is designed to be a permanent form of birth control. Although it is reversible there is no guarantee that the reversal will be successful and the procedure is costly. So either don't have one or bank some sperm and do the vasectomy; that way you could still have a biological child if desired down the road

Published on Feb 12, 2015

Answered by Steven N. Gange, MD, FACS (View Profile)

Vasectomy is designed to be a permanent form of birth control. Although it is reversible there is no guarantee that the reversal will be successful and the procedure is costly. So either don't have one or bank some sperm and do the vasectomy; that way you could still have a biological child if desired down the road

Published on Jul 11, 2012


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